Reviews: Grapples and Petite Treats

photo of GrapplesHello, friends! I have tried some great new things, and you might like these, too.

First, my family tried some snappy new flavored apples. They are called Grapples (pronounced grape-lz), and they are real apples, but they smell like grapes. That might sound like a strange combination, but you should try these Grapples.

They start out as regular Fuji apples (my favorite kind of apples), which are crisp, juicy and sweet. Then the growers use some kind of proprietary magical process to infuse the apples with grape essence, which gives the fruits an extremely fruity fragrance, and a slightly grapey flavor.

It’s hard to describe, but it’s delicious. If you enjoy a crisp, sweet apple with a fantastic aroma and a sense of novelty, give Grapples a try.

photo of Petite Treats bookThe second new thing I’m sharing is this cute little recipe book, called “Petite Treats.”

From the authors of “Mini Pies” and founders of the Seattle-based Mini Empire Bakery, “Petite Treats” shows you how to miniaturize everything from tiny fruit scones and mini pies to bite-size brownies and cutesy cannoli —sweet satisfaction guaranteed.

This book includes dozens of full-color photos and easy-to-follow recipes, as well as decorating and presentation tips.

I haven’t had a chance to make any of the recipes in the book yet, but the pictures are drool-inducing. I’m looking forward to trying the tiny doughnuts and mini whoopie pies! You can order “Petite Treats” from Amazon.

Apple Fritter Waffles with Maple Glaze

I haven’t tried these apple fritter waffles yet, but when this recipe landed in my inbox today, I knew I had to share it! It’s a waffle batter, but it includes yeast, like a deep fried doughnut! Like an apple-waffle-doughnut with maple glaze. Scroll down for a photo of the finished waffles.

Are you drooling yet? Here’s the recipe, from cookbook author Jess Thomson.

apple fritter waffle recipe

Instructions:

Make the batter
The night before you plan to serve the waffles, make the batter: Whisk the yeast, water, and 1 tablespoon of the sugar together in the work bowl of a stand mixer and set aside for 5 minutes. In a large bowl, whisk together the remaining 3/4 cup sugar, baking powder, mace, cinnamon, salt, and flour. Set aside. Add the butter, eggs, and vanilla to the foaming yeast mixture. Mix with the paddle attachment on low speed for about 1 minute, breaking up and melting the butter. With the mixer on low speed, add the dry ingredients about a third at a time, mixing until blended and scraping the sides down as necessary. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. (You can also make the batter an hour or two before serving and let it sit at room temperature, covered, for about 1 hour before making the waffles.)

Make the apples
Combine the apples, sugar, lemon juice, and cinnamon in a frying pan. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar melts, the liquid evaporates, and the apples are soft and beginning to disintegrate, 10 to 12 minutes. Allow the apples to cool to room temperature, then refrigerate them, and reheat before serving the waffles. (You can also make the apple compote in the morning.)

In the morning, make the glaze
In a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or using a large bowl with a whisk), blend the confectioners’ sugar, corn syrup, salt, vanilla and maple extracts, maple syrup, and hot water until all of the sugar has been incorporated, scraping the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula if necessary. (If the glaze seems to thick, add a little hot water, a teaspoon at a time.)

Make the waffles
Preheat a Belgian-style waffle iron to the “crisp exterior” setting (or follow manufacturer’s directions). Add a heaping cup of batter, and cook for 2 minutes, until golden brown. Break the waffle into 4 pieces and dip one side of each waffle into the glaze. Place two waffle squares glazed side-up on each of two plates, and top with some of the apple compote. Serve immediately, then repeat with the remaining batter, glaze, and compote.