Tips to Help Teens Find Jobs

The book is “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job”

Book cover
Book cover
My oldest kid is a 16 year old boy, who has recently decided he needs to get a job. When I was offered a chance to review “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job,” by Jim Comiskey, I thought the timing was perfect!

What’s inside?

The book follows two teenage reporters on assignment for their school paper to find out how to get and keep a job. As they interview three past graduates who have successful careers and businesses, they learn about each step of the job search process.

Along the way, the book has several worksheets for the reader to complete, which are designed to provide a self-evaluation of job-hunting and work readiness. The sections of the book address several stages of work/career, from preparing a resume and interviewing, to starting and keeping a job. It also addresses good employee attributes, such as having a positive attitude, working hard, cooperation, and time management.

Table of Contents
Table of Contents

The verdict

My son thought the information in the book was definitely valuable, but found the story of the interviews to be kind of cheesey and lame. He said, “I don’t want to offend anyone, but the dialogue seems kind of childish.”

Example of graphic from book
Example of graphic from book

I thought the information was useful — not only for first-time job seekers — but for anybody trying to improve a job situation, or for people changing fields or re-entering the job market. Although seasoned employees will probably not learn anything new from this book, it will be a valuable resource for teens! As a parent, I’m happy to provide my teenager another resource that reinforces the things I’ve been trying to tell him about having a positive attitude and being willing to work hard.

The bottom line

I recommend “A Teen’s Guide to Career Success: How to Get and Keep a Job” for any teens who are starting to look for work. It contains practical information that will help kids get started on the right foot, whether they are looking for summer jobs or considering long-term career possibilities.

PS

Thanks to Blue Point Books for providing me with a review copy of this book!

I’m not sure what to think about pay-per-post

I don’t want to offend anyone here, but I guess I might. It seems that Pay-Per-Post (PPP) badges are popping up on blogs everywhere. I understand that most bloggers are hoping to make some money. I know what kind of time goes into writing posts and maintaining a site, not to mention that most bloggers have families, “real” jobs, and lots of other things going on in their lives. I’m right there with you! I get it!

But when I read a post on a blog that has a PPP badge, or maybe a disclosure statement (explaining that some posts may or may not be influenced by sponsors), I wonder whether I’m reading a genuine article or a paid advertisement. Is it just me, or does a blog that accepts PPP writing assignments lose some of its credibility? Maybe I should read the whole blog before I decide whether it’s too commercial for me, but how many of us have time for that? Is that how you surf blogs? Probably not.

I’m not trying to sound high and mighty. Pay-Per-Post bloggers aren’t bad people. I’ve considered getting in on PPP myself, but I’ve decided against it. I’ve decided this blog is going to be all mine. Now if somebody wants to hire me to write for a separate publication, that’s a different story. But like it or not, this one’s all me. There you have it.

Are you a Slasher? Hint: most moms are!

You may have heard of a new trend in career designations recently. The “Slash Career” is gaining acceptance among mainstream workers. The Slash (/) is no longer reserved for the starving creative types, as in Actor/Busboy, Artist/Barista, Singer/Waitress, etc.

Nowadays, the Slash is popping up between more white collar and upper-middle class professional titles, such as Lawyer/Event Planner, and Executive/Life Coach. People who successfully manage dual careers seem to thrive on the variety in their lives. You know, like pretzels dipped in chocolate. I like pretzels, and I love chocolate. But when you put them in the same bite, they’re both even better!

Even though today’s hip, modern Slash Careers are getting more press, we all know that mothers are the original Slashers. I’m a mom, and I never know what to put down for “Occupation,” when I fill out a form. At first, when I was a new mom, I continued to use my former occupation. My “real” job.

It’s been a while since then, and I’ve gotten over it. The older I get, the less I care about what other people think of me. I’m completely consumed, fulfilled, and exhausted by my current profession as a mom working from home. So what do I write on the form? It’s hard to sum up what I do in just one word. But when I start listing the things I do for a living, it seems kind of arrogant to try to write them all down. I mean, who do I think I am? Wonder Woman? I just do what every other mom does… A little bit of everything!

So I usually just choose the occupational titles that mean the most to me personally: Wife and Mother. The other stuff is important, too, and the variety of activities is stimulating and delicious. But in the big picture, all the housework, blogging, entrepreneurial endeavors, and even charitable activities, pale in comparison to the significance of the work I do with my family. Yep, Wife/Mother. That’s me.